Get to know Diamond Fluorescence: Are diamonds with fluorescence good

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Get to know Diamond Fluorescence: Are diamonds with fluorescence good

Karen Dunn

Karen Dunn - 06 December, 2022

If you're thinking about buying lab-created jewelry or loose diamonds for your ornaments, you probably have some queries you'd like to clarify.

Diamond fluorescence is a distinctive feature that will pique your interest in the various characteristics of diamonds.

Diamond fluorescence has an extraordinary amount of a colorful glow (typically blue). This is noticeable when a diamond is present to Ultraviolet light.

However, in most circumstances, the appearance of a diamond with strong fluorescence is rarely modified. In other cases, the diamond’s glow, with intense fluorescence, may appear hazy and have an unlively look in daylight.

More uncommon than diamonds with a strong or extremely strong fluorescence are those with little or very little fluorescence.

Fluorescence does not impair the natural look of the diamond. Nevertheless, a high diamond fluorescence can also glow in the natural sunshine. This might be seen as being undesired in a white diamond.

The degree of fluorescence varies, with approximately one-third of all diamonds exhibiting some fluorescence. With 95% emitting a blue hue, green and yellow fluorescence diamonds may also be identified. Besides, they are far rarer than those radiating a blue hue.

Fluorescence is one indication or grading factor for a diamond; however, its presence does not always alter how a diamond appears.

Grade of a diamond fluorescence

In illumination conditions with enough UV wavelengths, medium to strong blue fluorescence often tries to conceal yellow body color. This further leads the diamonds in the lower color range to look a little bit whiter. It is "theoretically" good in these situations.

Recent research, however, has shown that as the space between the light sources increases, the fluorescence impact rapidly decreases.

The gape from the light source is too deep in almost all typical indoor viewing situations to stimulate the fluorescence impact.

The notion that fluorescence enhances the look of diamonds with lesser hues is thus entirely erroneous. As a result, it is often not so good or bad in terms of aesthetic quality. Especially when worn with one of those numerous diamond engagement rings.

For a value shopper, especially one who enjoys the fluorescence phenomena, fluorescence can be seen as a good thing. Frequently it manages to lower the price of a diamond.

However, resale value and liquidity can frequently suffer much more. Thus a long-term viewpoint should be considered before purchasing a diamond with substantial fluorescence.

The risk of laboratories overgrading the color of diamonds with this attribute has been a subject of significant controversy. In the industry in recent years, this worry has had an influence on the value of fluorescent diamonds.

Even though laboratory color grading is undertaken in bright spaces that do contain UV, the grading takes place with the diamond in very close vicinity of the UV source.

Moreover, there is concern that the diamond fluorescence effect can mask the true body color. This results in higher color grades for these stones.

Independent surveys have revealed severe issues with the color grading precision of luminous diamonds.

Is diamond fluorescence present in every diamond?

Fluorescence is not a grading element in the same way that the GIA 4Cs (color, clarity, cut, and carat weight) are. However, it is a distinguishing feature.

The fluorescence of a diamond is described in GIA Diamond Grading Reports and Diamond Dossiers by its intensity. Furthermore, it was also described under long-wave ultraviolet light, including None, Faint, Medium, Strong, and Very Strong.

The hue of the fluorescence will be indicated if it is Medium, Strong, or Very Strong.

Is there a hazy or oily nature to diamonds with fluorescence?

Fluorescence does not induce haziness in diamonds, according to GIA studies.

Fluorescence can worsen a diamond's pre-existing haziness. Yet, when produced by light-scattering flaws, lowering contrast in the face-up pattern, it does not create haziness in and of itself.

Since light-scattering faults are extremely rare, most buyers do not need to be concerned about fluorescence affecting the look of a diamond. Even though, in normal lighting circumstances, the diamond possesses strong to very strong fluorescence.

However, this does not exclude purchasers from inspecting a diamond in person. If fluorescence is present, any haziness will be seen under daylight-equivalent illumination.

Can a non-specialist tell the difference between diamonds that have fluorescence and diamonds that don't?

GIA experts collected sets of E, G, I, and K color-grade diamonds to evaluate the influence of blue fluorescence on diamond appearance. Except for the level of their blue fluorescence, the diamonds in each pair were as similar as possible.

Diamond graders, qualified experts, and laypeople evaluated the diamonds under controlled conditions to assess their appearance.


It appears that no systematic fluorescence effects were identified for the typical observer. Moreover, they are supposed to indicate the jewelry-buying population.

When seen table-up, viewers considered intensely blue fluorescent diamonds to have a superior color look. The majority of observers perceived no correlation between fluorescence and transparency.

Is having diamond fluorescence beneficial?

Fluorescence in diamonds has no beneficial or adverse effects. Diamond fluorescence can be lovely and exciting to some individuals but not to others. All points of view are represented.

If you are thinking about purchasing a diamond with bluish fluorescence, compare it to other diamonds of the same color grade. Further, examine it in various lighting conditions, including natural daylight.

Consider whether you like it or whether you notice a difference.

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